October is Energy Awareness Month

[OCT. 16, 2000]  As you know, winter is just around the corner. With gas prices going up, the colder months will surely have a bitter bite. Lincoln Junior Womanís Club would like to help keep your costs down by giving you a few energy saving tips. Oct. 15 through 21 is Lincoln Junior Womanís Club Week. Each day, an energy awareness tip will be posted.

Lincoln Ag Center
1441 State Route 10 East
Lincoln, IL
217-732-7948

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Blue Dog Inn
111 S. Sangamon
217-735-1743

Open for Lunch  Mon.-Sat.
Open for Dinner  Tues.-Sat.

Click here to view our
menu and gift items

25 Cents per Gallon
Self-vendored
reverse osmosis water

The Culligan
Fresh Water Station

318 N. Chicago St., Lincoln


Tips to save energy

Use screw-in-type compact fluorescent bulbs rather than ordinary incandescent household bulbs. You'll save between 75 and 80 percent on energy per socket. Also, compact fluorescent bulbs last 10 to13 times longer and operate cooler than incandescent bulbs.

Remember: When you permanently leave rooms in your house, turn the lights out and appliances off, including the television and radio.


Part 2

Planning for a slimmer, trimmer you

[OCT. 14, 2000]  Swimsuit season is over. Cool weather is fast approaching, and, believe it or not, the holiday season is only a few months away.  As the hours of sunshine decrease and the degrees dip into the lower double digits, itís only natural that people stay inside more and tend to be less active. Coupled with that, as the holidays approach, they bring a time of gift-giving, helping those in need, spreading good cheer....and food. Lots of food. Itís important to start watching your eating habits now and preparing for those calorie-laden times.

 If youíre planning for a slimmer, trimmer you, experts advise checking out the facts first.

Most of the popular diets now are based on the idea that carbohydrates are bad and many people are insulin-resistant, which causes them to pack on the pounds when they eat things like sweet potatoes, corn and pasta. Authors of these diets point out that people eating more carbohydrates are heavier than before. But people are also eating more calories, which is the real reason they are gaining weight, according to the ADA. Besides the low-carb diets, there are always the over-the-counter liquid meal replacements and very low-calorie diets that require medical supervision. These arenít advised for long-term weight loss, but rather serve a short-term purpose because they donít teach lifelong habits.

 

Most diet books make promises they canít deliver, because their concepts are based on short-term results. The ADA recommends in its book "Dieting for Dummies," co-written with Jane Kirby, R.D., to nix the short-term diets that swear off favorite foods, focus on denial, promise immediate results, allow no room for mistakes and ban some foods while emphasizing eating in general. Instead, people should adopt long-term life goals and concentrate on making healthier choices; focus on enjoying feeling better, healthier and more energized; establish flexible, short-term attainable goals; leave room for indulgences; and encourage variety while eating healthy and exercising.

Itís been said before and still remains true ó the best way to lose weight is to pick a sensible eating plan that includes a variety of foods and is easy to live with, accompanied by daily exercise. The answer isnít found in fad diets or a magical powder drink but in a healthful eating plan and lifestyle.

Olson said if a person just needs to lose an extra five pounds packed on during the holidays, then they probably donít need to see a doctor before they start dieting. But if a person has been overweight for a few years and has high blood pressure, for example, then they should consult their doctor before beginning a weight loss program.

 

The ADA recommends the following steps to lose weight and keep it off:

*Eat a variety of foods.

*Balance the food you eat with exercise.

*Choose a diet with plenty of grains, vegetables and fruits. These foods are low in fat.

*Choose a diet low in fat, saturated fat and cholesterol. Fat should be 30 percent of your total calories.

*Eat sugar in moderation. Sugary foods are low in nutrients and have unnecessary calories.

*Use salt and sodium in moderation.

*Drink alcoholic beverages in moderation. They supply calories but few or no nutrients.

Olson said she recommends staying away from junk foods that contain refined sugar and from fat and fried foods. She also recommends eating smaller amounts of food, spread out during the day, eating in moderation and eating sensible meals from the basic food groups: fruit, vegetables and lean meat. Breakfast is important. If a person cuts out 500 calories a day ó the equivalent of two donuts and a small bag of chips ó they can lose one pound a week.

 

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10 diet tips

(source: FadDiet.com)

  1. Donít skip breakfast. Your bodyís metabolism rate slows down at night and doesnít speed up again until you eat something. Donít go more than five hours during the day without eating, and if you do, eat healthy, low-fat snacks in between meals.

  2. Brush and floss your teeth immediately after eating a meal so your mouth is clean and eating more is less appealing.

  3. Chew gum instead of nibbling food.

  4. Eat your meal slowly at the table or an appealing place, instead of in front of the television. Drink at least two glasses of water during your meal to feel fuller and eat less.

  5. Weight in pounds multiplied by 15 will equal the number of calories per day you need to consume to maintain that weight. Example: 500 calories less a day will result in approximately a one-pound weight loss per week. Keep a daily diary of calorie intake.

  6. Keep healthy foods like fruit or vegetables on hand. Eat only if hungry.

  7. Keep a dairy of your eating habits and feelings. Document everything before you eat it and describe how you feel as you progress in your weight loss.

  8. Soups are a great meal and are filling, tasty and healthy, but watch the sodium content. Even low-sodium brands have more than most other types of meals.

  9. Donít starve yourself or skip meals, because your bodyís starvation defenses will kick in and lower your metabolism.

  10. Donít make the mistake of thinking that because you are eating low fat/low calorie foods you can eat all you want. Calories still add up and must be burned off regardless of what kind of food you eat. Balance is key.

 

"It doesnít have to be low-protein, because protein will fill you up," and low-fat cheese, lean meat and skim milk are good choices, she said.

Another key to successful weight loss is keeping a written food diary and making note of everything you put in your mouth. She said many of her patients who say they have tried every diet under the sun start eating 500 less calories a day, getting daily exercise and keeping a food diary, and they usually lose weight.

[Penny Zimmerman-Wills]

 

 


Part 1

Planning for a slimmer, trimmer you

[OCT. 13, 2000]  Swimsuit season is over. Cool weather is fast approaching, and, believe it or not, the holiday season is only a few months away.

As the hours of sunshine decrease and the degrees dip into the lower double digits, itís only natural that people stay inside more and tend to be less active. Coupled with that, as the holidays approach, they bring a time of gift-giving, helping those in need, spreading good cheer....and food. Lots of food.

First the traditional Thanksgiving meal brings noodles and dressing and pecan pie. Then come Christmas celebrations, school gatherings, office parties and family dinners with tables heavy with crab dip, meatballs, cheese trays, and more cookies and pies. Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the kitchen, New Yearís Eve parties lie ahead, which means champagne toasts and calorie-laden tidbits to snack on while ringing in the new year.

Even though all that seems so far away, itís important to start watching your eating habits now and preparing for those calorie-laden times.

More than 50 percent of citizens in the United States are overweight and are eating seven percent more calories than they did 20 years ago. To combat the problem, they spend more than $30 billion every year to lose weight, according to the American Dietetic Association (ADA). But many times the diet plans and gimmicks donít work. "If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is," said Amy Olson, registered dietitian and certified diabetics educator at SIU School of Medicine.

There is certainly no lack of information on the subject. Everywhere you look there are testimonials, statistics and advice from nutritional experts to entertainers touting their own version of how to lose weight. Thereís the cabbage soup diet....the low-carbohydrates diet...the three-day diet...the SlimFast diet...the Scarsdale diet ó the options are endless.

Many of the most popular diets making the rounds today are based on the Atkins diet, which preaches a low-carbohydrate regime. Other versions include the Carb Addictís diet, which limits carb consumption by eating them less frequently and more quickly; the Suzanne Somers diet, which advises not to eat fats with carbs and to eat fruit alone; the Zone, which touts a low-carbohydrate consumption balanced with the right amount of protein and fat; and the Combo Diet, which allows eating proteins and starchy carbs together to keep the food from being stored as fat.

 

These fat-embracing, low-carb diets are a resurgence of the craze started in the í70s by the Scarsdale and Dr. Atkinsí diets and are topping the bestseller lists and being discussed on the talk show circuits. They allow you to eat all the steak you want but not with a baked potato on the side. You can go through the drive-through at your favorite fast food hangout and order the cheeseburger; just throw out the bun. Eat all the ribs and pot roast you want, just not pasta or rice. Itís hard to argue with a diet that lets you have bacon and eggs for breakfast, a bacon cheeseburger and salad for lunch, and a porterhouse steak for dinner. Whatís not to like?

 

[to top of second column in this section]

 

10 red flags that signal bad nutrition advice

(source: Dieting for Dummies, by Jane Kirby, R.D. and the American Dietetic Association)

How do you know if the nutrition advice you read about or see advertised is reliable? Any combination of these 10 signals should send up a red flag:

  1. Recommendations that promise a quick fix.

  2. Danger warnings from a single product or regimen.

  3. Claims that sound too good to be true.

  4. Simplistic conclusions drawn from a complex study.

  5. Recommendations based on a single study.

  6. Dramatic statements that are refuted by reputable scientific organizations.

  7. Lists of good and bad foods.

  8. Recommendations made to help sell a product.

  9. Recommendations based on studies published without peer review.

  10. Recommendations from studies that ignore differences among individuals or groups.

"Itís not a balanced nutritious, healthy diet," Olson said. "I wouldnít recommend it for a lifestyle diet. Itís a fad that has come and gone over the years. For many people, weight loss is difficult but weight maintenance is really difficult," so any kind of fad diet is going to be hard to maintain for life. "Itís not a healthy way to lose weight. If you follow it, you will probably lose weight, which will be mostly water," but the pounds will come back when you start eating normally again.

Olson isnít alone; many nutritional and medical experts arenít jumping on the fat bandwagon quite so fast ó disapproving of the fad dietsí high levels of protein and fat and lack of fiber. Despite their popularity and testimonials from everyone from Oprah to Suzanne who praise their results, experts warn that these diets arenít heaven on earth. Risks include an increased chance of heart disease from eating more high-protein foods, which are also high in fat.

The ADA, which is a professional organization representing the nationís licensed nutritionists and dietitians, claims that the Atkins diet and similar diets trigger short-term weight loss through ketosis, which occurs when the body lacks a sufficient supply of carbohydrates, a primary source of energy. So after losing water weight, you will eventually lose muscle mass. The diets also largely dismiss fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which are proven to be healthy.

So if youíre planning for a slimmer, trimmer you, experts advise checking out the facts first.

(To be continued)

 

[Penny Zimmerman-Wills]

 

[click here for Part 2]

Lincoln Ag Center
1441 State Route 10 East
Lincoln, IL
217-732-7948

We support Lincolndailynews.com!

Click here to visit our website!!!

Blue Dog Inn
111 S. Sangamon
217-735-1743

Open for Lunch  Mon.-Sat.
Open for Dinner  Tues.-Sat.

Click here to view our
menu and gift items

25 Cents per Gallon
Self-vendored
reverse osmosis water

The Culligan
Fresh Water Station

318 N. Chicago St., Lincoln


Animals for adoption

 

These animals and more are available to good homes from the Logan County Animal Control at 1515 N. Kickapoo, phone 735-3232.

Fees for animal adoption: dogs, $60/male, $65/female; cats, $35/male, $44/female. The fees include neutering and spaying.

Logan County Animal Control's hours of operation:

Sunday  Ė  closed

Monday  Ė  8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Tuesday  Ė  8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Wednesday  Ė  8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Thursday  Ė  8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Friday  Ė  8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Saturday  Ė  closed

Warden: Sheila Farmer
Assistant:  Michelle Mote
In-house veterinarian:  Dr. Lester Thompson

DOGS
Big to little, most these dogs will make wonderful lifelong companions when you take them home and provide solid, steady training, grooming and general care. Get educated about what you choose. If you give them the time and care they need, you will be rewarded with much more than you gave them. They are entertaining, fun, comforting, and will lift you up for days on end.

Be prepared to take the necessary time when you bring home a puppy, kitten, dog, cat or any other pet, and you will be blessed.


[This white and tan mix dog is very good-natured. He is about 2 years old and needs a good home.]

[This affectionate puppy is about 1 year old, a brindle-colored mix, and would make a good family pet.]

[There are only four of these Lab-mix puppies left. They are about 8 weeks old. The motherís owner could not keep all of them. Will you open your home to one or more of these puppies?]

[Claudia is a 2-year-old sheltie mix. She is sweet and well-suited to a home with children.]

Think You're Pregnant?

WE CAN HELP.

 

(217) 735-4838

Free and Confidential:
Pregnancy Testing. Information and Counseling. Supportive Services.

"A CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTER"
#5 Arcade Building, Lincoln

Claire's Needleworks
and Frame Shop
"We Frame It All"
On the square
in downtown Lincoln
217-732-8811
M-F 10-5  Sat 10-4
cmstitches@aol.com

Gossett's Cleaners
will soon be closing to move into our brand new
facilities at 621 Woodlawn.

Please pick up any overdue orders. We regret any inconvenience to our customers.

Ten reasons to adopt a shelter dog

 1.  I'll bring out your playful side!

 2.  I'll lend an ear to your troubles.

 3.   I'll keep you fit and trim.

 4.   We'll look out for each other.

 5.   We'll sniff out fun together!

 6.   I'll keep you right on schedule.

 7.   I'll love you with all my heart.

 8.   We'll have a tail-waggin' good time!

 9.   We'll snuggle on a quiet evening.

10.   We'll be best friends always.

CATS
Many of the same cats are still available, with a few new ones added. The gorgeous white cat with two different color eyes is looking very dejected. His master died and there's no one to take him. There are a number of other fine cats there too!
       
[Please adopt one or both of these playful yellow and white kittens. They were born about four months ago on a farm.]

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